Skull Fracture

Frontal bone fractureID:

14 year-old female, previously healthy, brought in by ambulance s/p auto vs. pedestrian.

HPI:

Incident unwitnessed, paramedics report no LOC with GCS 15 at scene. GCS 10 upon arrival to ED, with 2min GTC seizure. Patient intubated for airway protection and CT head showed non-displaced frontal bone fracture and small frontal SAH. Patient self-extubated, returned to baseline mental status and was transferred to PICU.

PE:

  • VS: 128/76mmHg, 120bpm, 22 R/min, 100% RA, 37.6°C
  • General: Alert and responsive young female with multiple bandages on extremities
  • HEENT: Right frontal hematoma, no bony defect palpated, multiple facial abrasions, no otorrhea, no rhinorrhea, TM clear b/l, no other ecchymosis.
  • CV: RRR, normal S1/S2, no M/R/G
  • Lungs: CTAB
  • Abdomen: +BS, soft, NT/ND, no rebound/guarding, no flank ecchymoses
  • Neuro: AAOx3, CN II-XII intact, sensation/motor/reflexes symmetric and intact.
  • Extremities: Well-perfused with good pulses, no focal bony tenderness, no joint effusions, multiple abrasions on extensor surfaces of all four extremities.

Assessment & Plan:

14yo female, previously healthy, s/p auto vs. peds followed by GTC seizure and CT head showing small SAH and non-displaced frontal bone skull fracture. No evidence of basilar skull fracture on examination or imaging. Seizure likely 2/2 irritation from SAH. Patient was followed closely in PICU with q1h neuro checks with low threshold for repeat CT if change in mental status or more seizures occurred. The patient was eventually transferred to the general ward and was discharged with neurology follow-up and Keppra for seizure prophylaxis for 6mo.

Types of Skull Fractures:

A system for skull fractures

Sore Throat

Oropharynx AnatomyID:

17 year-old female presenting to the pediatric ED with sore throat for 2 days.

HPI:

The patient reports steadily worsening sore throat over the past 2 days, associated with a sensation of swelling. The pain is described as sharp, 4/10 in severity, located on the left side of her throat, and worsened with swallowing. She denies inability to swallow or difficulty breathing, she also denies fever, cough, new skin rashes or genital lesions.

She has no PMH/PSH, takes no medications, denies t/e/d use and is not currently sexually active.

PE:

  • VS: 111/65mmHg, 80bpm, 97.8°, 16/min, 100% RA
  • Gen: Well-appearing, NAD
  • HEENT: PERRL, no conjunctival injection, TM clear b/l, minimal pharyngeal erythema on left with 6mm white circular lesion on left tonsil, no tonsillar enlargement, no uvular deviation, no cervical LAD, neck supple no masses, normal neck ROM
  • CV: RRR, no M/R/G, Lungs: CTAB
  • Abdomen: +BS, soft, NT/ND
  • Ext: Warm, well-perfused, normal peripheral pulses

Assessment & Plan:

17yo female with no significant PMH with acute pharyngitis for 2 days. The most likely cause of the patient’s symptoms is viral pharyngitis, potentially herpangina (given the appearance of the tonsillar lesion). A more serious viral/bacterial pharyngitis is less likely given the absence of fever or significant erythema/exudate. There was no uvular deviation to suggest peritonsillar abscess and no evidence of airway obstruction to suggest other acute processes (epiglottitis, retropharyngeal abscess). The plan is to recommend supportive care and ibuprofen for symptomatic relief. The patient will be discharged home in good condition with precautions to return if symptoms worsen or she begins to have difficulty swallowing/breathing.

Differential Diagnosis of Acute Pharyngitis:

Acute Pharyngitis

 

Evaluation (history):

  • Respiratory distress: epiglottitis, retropharyngeal abscess, peritonsillar abscess, EBV (obstruction in or near pharynx)
  • Fatigue: infectious mononucleuosis
  • Abrupt onset: epiglottitis

Evaluation (physical examination):

  • Vesicles anterior: herpetic stomatitis, SJS, Behcet
  • Vesicles posterior: herpangina (± involvement of extremities)
  • Asymmetry: peritonsillar abscess
  • Stridor, drooling, respiratory distress: airway obstruction
  • Generalized inflammation: Kawasaki